We Shall not forget or forgive – Abbott on Health

Posted on February 6, 2011

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Federal Government Health funding decreases.

The Federal Government has cut its share of public hospital funding by 10 percent over the past decade, a new government report shows.

The figures from Federal Government agency the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare come as the blame game intensifies over public hospital woes.

While the actual amount the Federal Government spends on public hospitals has increased from $5billion to $10billion over the past decade, it is now contributing far less than the states, which give almost $12billion.

The report shows the Federal Government’s share of public hospital funding from 45 to 41 per cent between 1995-96 and 2005-06, while the states; share rose from 46 per cent to 51 per cent.


SOURCE: CANBERRA TIMES, 5 OCTOBER 2007

Fed: Cut in public hospital funding planned years ago

The states knew back in 2003 that the Federal Government’s share of public hospital funding was going to drop off.

The states initially refused to sign the current five-year Australian health care agreements with the Commonwealth because they claimed it would make them $1 billion worse off over four years compared with the old agreements.

As it turns out, they were being optimistic.

Figures released today show commonwealth funding for public hospitals under the current deal has dropped 2.8 per cent to 34.1 per cent since 2003, while the states’ funding grew 2.5 per cent to 50.6 per cent.

It means that while the actual amount the federal government spending on public hospitals each year has increased from about $9.1 billion to $10.1 billion in the past three years, it is now contributing far less than the states.

The states over the same period increased their share of public hospital spending from $9.8 billion to about $12.3 billion.

Back in 2003, the states eventually caved and approved the agreements because of a clause that imposed fines if they failed to sign by a certain date.

The states complained bitterly in 2003, and have done so again today.

But no doubt they feel somewhat vindicated that a federal government agency has backed up their claims of underfunding.

SOURCE: AAP NEWS, 5 OCTOBER 2007

The Government’s spending as a proportion of total health spending fell while other Western countries, on average, recorded a slight rise over recent years.

In the past decade, the Federal share of hospital funding dropped from 47.6% to 44.2 per cent, while states and territories lifted their share from 43.3 per cent to 48 per cent.

SOURCE: SYDNEY MORNING HERALD 29 September 2006

Despite a large shortage of GPs, as Health Minister in the Howard Government Tony Abbott capped the Federal funding of GP training places.

SOURCE: BUDGET PAPERS 03-04, 04-05, 05-06, 06-07

 

Two thirds of Australia is not adequately serviced by GPs, new figures suggest.

More than 65 percent of Australia has been designated as “areas of workplace shortage”, meaning the number of GPs is below the accepted figure of one-to-1400 people.

According to the figures, which were supplied by the Department of Health and Ageing to a Senate committee and based on 2003-04 benchmarks, more than half the country has been in that state for more than a year.

A spokeswoman for Health Minsiter Tony Abbott acknowledged there was a shortage of health professionals in some areas.

SOURCE: THE AUSTRALIAN, 17 MAY 2007

Tony Abbott was more focused on his own re-election, than getting the health policy right in July 2007. He wouldn’t start negotiations for the next Australian Health Care Agreements because he prioritised his own re-election over the health of Australians.

Scott: It looked friendly enough, but the mood at today’s meeting of health ministers turned frosty when the issue of health funding was raised.

Even though it was on the agenda, federal Health Minister Tony Abbott wouldn’t discuss the Australian Health Care Agreement, saying negotiations shouldn’t start until after the federal election.

Tony Abbott: I don’t see any point in having this discussion when there is some question as to who is going to form a government.

Scott: In a frank acknowledgement of the Federal Government’s position, Mr Abbott said long-term planning was not on his agenda.

Tony Abbott: The important task at the present time is to get re-elected and that is where my energies are focused.

SOURCE: LATELINE, 24 JULY 2007.

Tony Abbott says health costs and queues are necessary.

“Costs and queues is what ensures that services are not overused…So [hospital] waiting lists and gap payments are a necessary part of the system I am afraid.”

SOURCE: AUSTRALIAN FINANCIAL REVIEW, 1 JUNE 2006.

Tony Abbott opposed the Government’s reforms before they were even announced.

“I think it is hugely improbable he is going to come up with a policy we are going to support”

SOURCE: SYDNEY MORNING HERALD, 3 DECEMBER 2009.

Tony Abbott gave an iron-clad guarantee that they would keep the Medicare Plus safety net after the 2004 election but he broke that promise after the election.

Fullerton: Will this Government commit to keeping Medicare-plus-safety-net as it is now in place after the election?

Tony Abbott: Yes

Fullerton: That’s a cast-iron commitment?

Tony Abbott: Cast-iron commitment. Absolutely

Fullerton 80 percent out-of-pocket expenses rebatable over $300. over $700?

Tony Abbott: That is an absolutely rock solid, iron-clad commitment.

SOURCE: FOUR CORNERS, 6 SEPTEMBER 2004.

When he was Health Minister in the Howard Government, Tony Abbott believed that one level of government in charge of the health system was a good policy. Recently, Tony Abbott attacked The Government’s health reform plan, playing politics with the health and well being of Australian families.

Tony Abbott said:

“I certainly think it makes sense to have one level of government in charge of the health system.”

“I think that sooner or later the blame game has got to end and the only way that that will happen is if one level of government is in  charge.”

SOURCE: INSIDERS PROGRAM, 4 SEPTEMBER 2005.

To view the full transcript click here.

 

Mr Abbott all but declared the Coalition would oppose the health plan in the Senate.

As Mr Abbott attacked the health policy…Mr Rudd reminded voters there was more to come with announcements pending on mental health, increased beds, more doctors and nurses, aged care and dental care.

SOURCE: SYDNEY MORNING HERALD, 7 MARCH 2010

And I could go on and on and on but my hand is sore copying and pasting all his lies and deception. Abbott can not be trusted

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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